Le Corbusier Furniture Collage

Le Corbusier Furniture – Comprehensive Guide (LC1 – LC19)

Le Cobusier Perriand and Jeanneret

The Le Corbusier Studio Furniture

The Le Corbusier furniture collection (LC for short) is a line of furniture designed by the trio: Le Corbusier (born Charles Edouard Jeanneret) (1887-1965), Charlotte Perriand (1903-1999), and Pierre Jeanneret (1896-1967). The 14 piece foundation of the LC furniture collection was made from 1928-1930.

Thonet 209

Thonet and Le Corbusier

Prior to 1928 Le Corbusier had been furnishing the buildings he designed with furniture from Austrian furniture manufacturer Thonet. Actually you’ve probably encountered the iconic 209 Bentwood Armchair (designed by Gebruder Thonet in 1900) at some point in your life. Le Corbusier was obsessed with this chair and used it many of his projects. This relationship with Thonet would prove pivotal later on down the road.

LC 1 – Basculant or Sling Chair

This was intended as a “distilled” version of an expedition chair.

The LC1 is composed of a steel structure and frames either a leather or cowhide seat/back.

Also known as the B301 model.

This chair debuted as a a selection from the 14 piece (at the time) collection at the 1929 Paris Salon D’ Automne.

Year made: 1928

LC Grand Comfort Armchair

LC 2 – Grand Comfort Armchair, Petite Modele

Possibly the most recognizable of the LC series of furniture, this chair was constructed from a welded chromium-plated steel frame.

The steel frame of the LC 2 chair housed an uber comfortable 5 upholstered cushions (commonly made of black leather) with tensile straps.

This was the iconic chair used in the iconic Maxell tape advertisements (1981). Check it out here.

Year made: 1928

LC 3 Grand Confort Armchair

LC 3 Fauteuil Grand Confort, Grand Modele

The LC 3 (and the LC 2) were considered so incredibly comfortable to sit in that the Le Corbusier Group referred to them as “cushion baskets”.

The LC 3 is a plumper, wider version of the LC 2 armchair.

The chrome plated steel tubular frame can barely contain the leather upholstered cushions. Chubby, yet luxurious.

Year made: 1928

LC 4 Chaise Longue

LC 4 Chaise Longue

The LC4 Chaise Longue or Long Chair (in English) is often described as the “resting machine”.

It is included in the permanent collection at the MOMA.

This reclining chair is also known as model B306, and was part of the “Equipment For Living” series made by the Le Corbusier Group.

Also known as model B306

Year made: 1928

LC 5 Sofa

LC 5 Sofa

The LC 5 Sofa was originally designed for Le Corbusier’s apartment in Paris (it was recently restored and reopened to the public. Check it out here) .

Framed by just a few pieces of metal, this was Le Corbusier’s interpretation of the “armless sofa”.

Year made: 1934

LC 6 Table

LC 6 Table

The LC 6 Table is also known as “Table Tube D’Avion.”

This glass and metal table was first introduced at the Salon D’Automne (Paris) in 1929.

Year made: 1928

LC 7 Revolving Armchair

LC 7 Revolving Armchair

The LC 7 is also known as the “swivel chair”, or “fauteuil tournant.”

This chair was based on the design of a traditional typist’s chair, and made for use at a desk.

Also known as model B302

Year made: 1928

LC 8 Swivel Stool

LC 8 Swivel Stool

The LC 8 originated from experiments that included wrapping rubber around tubular steel.

This stool is a variant of the LC 7 swivel chair.

The LC 8 was originally designed by Charlotte Perriand for her apartment in Paris.

Year made: 1928

LC 9 Chrome Bath Stool

LC 9 Chrome Bath Stool

Charlotte Perriand originally designed the LC 9 Stool for the dining room of her Paris apartment.

The original version had a rattan seat.

The LC 9 was part of the “Equipment For The Home” display at the Salon D’Automne (Paris) in 1929.

Year made: 1927

LC 10 Low Table

LC 10 Table

The LC 10 is also known as “Table En Tube”.

This table was originally featured at the Salon D’Automne (Paris) as a desk.

Charlotte Perriand revisited the original design in 1984 and developed varying versions to meet current practicality.

Year made: 1928

LC 11 Table

There were originally two versions of the the LC 11 Table. The first (made for Le Corbusier’s home in Paris) had a marble top. The second (made in 1935) had a slate top.

Relaunched by Cassina in 1985, it is now available with a wooden top.

Year made: 1934

LC 12 Table La Roche

LC 12 Table La Roche

The LC 12 table was originally made for a home designed by Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret (1923-1925) in Paris.

That particular home they designed in Paris (Maison La Roche) currently serves as the headquarters for Foundation Le Corbusier.

Year made: 1925

LC 13 Wagon Fumoir Arm Chair

LC 13 Wagon Fumoir Arm Chair

The LC 13 chair was originally made for the smoking carriages (remember those?) of the French railway.

Upholstered traditionally in black leather, the cushions are not affixed to the seat and seem to “float” within the tubular chromed steel frame.

Year made: 1931

LC 14 Tabouret Stool

LC 14 Tabouret Stool

First conceived as boxes (1952), in 1955 the LC 14 stool was retooled for childrens’ rooms in the Unite d’Habitation in Nantes Reze.

The later versions of the LC 14 feature simple right angles (as opposed to the earlier “dove tail” joints).

Year made: 1952

LC 15 Table De Conference

LC 15 Table De Conference

The LC 15 table was designed by Le Corbusier for both home and work settings.

This table was produced after the collaboration between Charlotte Perriand, Pierre Jeanneret, and Le Corbusier ended.

Year made: 1958

LC 16 Wood Desk

LC 16 Wood Desk

The LC 16 was originally designed for the Maison Radieuse in Nantes Reze.

This desk was considered an “interface” project (or a link between the home and man).

Year made: 1930

LC 17 Portemanteau

LC 17 Portemanteau

The LC 17 is a coatrack designed by Le Corbusier for Cabanon (his summer home on the Cote D’azur).

Le Corbusier designed the LC 17 with the idea of compact comfort offered in a cruise ship cabin.

Year made: 1957

LC 19 Table Esprit Nouveau

LC 19 Table Esprit Nouveau

The LC 19 was designed by Pierre Jeanneret in 1925.

It was originally designed as a writing desk, and later on as a perfect complement to the LC 7 Revolving Armchair.

Year made: 1925

Where is LC 18?

You may have noticed that there is no LC 18, and you are correct. Where the hell is it? I have no idea. For some strange reason there simply is no piece named LC 18. Perhaps Le Corbusier forgot? Perhaps he had an irrational fear of the number 18? Until further notice, this will have to remain a design mystery.

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